Transportation
12:45 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Warm Weather Brings Road Repairs

Credit Better Roads

With warmer temperatures, city, county and state road crews are turning their attention from snow plows to patching potholes.

The problem arises every winter, but this year seems to be worse due to the severity of weather conditions over the last six weeks.

“During the winter season, pavement takes a lot of punishment,” said Nancy Albright, deputy state highway engineer for Project Delivery and Preservation.

Potholes begin with water seeping into roadway cracks. Freezing and thawing temperatures cause pavement to expand and break apart.

“Combine these elements with plowing, salting and sheer volume of traffic over broken pavement, and small cracks can quickly become potholes,” Albright said.

Albright said Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews will be out patching potholes every day that weather permits over the next several weeks.

KYTC District 9 Information Officer Allen Blair said crews have already begun patching roadways this week.  Blair said the public is encouraged to report potholes to KYTC by calling 1-800-FOR-KYTC.

Maysville City Manager Ray Young said public works employees have also been filling potholes when weather has permitted.

"There's a bunch of them out there," Young said.

Young said it helps if citizens call and report pothole locations.  He said callers will be advised if the location is within the city right of way and if not, the pothole location will be referred to the state highway. Young said with the snow melting and rain in the forecast, the problem will continue until drier weather arrives.

"Salt, cinders, plow trucks and grader blades don't work well with paved surfaces," said Mason County Judge-Executive James L. "Buddy" Gallenstein.

Motorists are advised to watch for work crews and lane closures and to be patient with those working.

The Ledger Independent is online at: http://www.maysville-online.com