WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays at 9:06 a.m. (Friday at 9:30 a.m.), 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

britannica.com

August 16, 2017 -- The Klondike Gold Rush was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899.  

Public Domain

August 15, 2017 -- Bessie Lillian Gordy Carter was the mother of former President of the United States, Jimmy Carter. She was also known for her contribution to nursing in her home state of Georgia and as a Peace Corps volunteer in India as well as writing two books during the Carter presidency.  

biography.com

August 14, 2017 -- John Henry "Doc" Holliday was an American gambler, gunfighter, and dentist, and a good friend of Wyatt Earp. He is best known for his role as a temporary deputy marshal in the events leading up to and following the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. 

Public Domain

August 11, 2017 -- Sir Angus Frank Johnstone-Wilson was an English novelist and short story writer. He was awarded the 1958 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for The Middle Age of Mrs Eliot and later received a knighthood for his services to literature.  

history.com

August 10, 2017 -- Herbert Clark Hoover was an American politician who served as the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933 during the Great Depression.   

biography.com

August 9, 2017 -- Pamela Lyndon Travers was an Australian-born writer who spent most of her career in England. She is best known for the Mary Poppins series of children's books, which feature the magical nanny Mary Poppins.   

poetryfoundation.org

August 8,2017 -- Sara Teasdale received public admiration for her well-crafted lyrical poetry which centered on a woman's changing perspectives on beauty, love, and death. Many of Teasdale's poems chart developments in her own life, from her experiences as a sheltered young woman in St. Louis, to those as a successful yet increasingly uneasy writer in New York City, to a depressed and disillusioned person who would commit suicide in 1933. Although many later critics would not consider Teasdale a major poet, she was popular in her lifetime with both the public and critics.

August 7, 2017  

biography.com

August 4, 2017 -- Raoul Wallenberg was a Swedish architect, businessman, diplomat and humanitarian. He is widely celebrated for saving tens of thousands of Jews in Nazi-occupied Hungary during the Holocaust from German Nazis and Hungarian Fascists during the later stages of World War II. While serving as Sweden's special envoy in Budapest between July and December 1944, Wallenberg issued protective passports and sheltered Jews in buildings designated as Swedish territory.  

Public Domain

August 3, 2017 -- Elisha Graves Otis was an American industrialist, founder of the Otis Elevator Company, and inventor of a safety device that prevents elevators from falling if the hoisting cable fails.  

National Humanities Institute

August 2, 2017 -- Irving Babbitt was an American academic and literary critic, noted for his founding role in a movement that became known as the New Humanism, a significant influence on literary discussion and conservative thought in the period between 1910 and 1930.

biography.com

August 1, 2017 -- Robert Todd Lincoln was an American politician, lawyer, and businessman. He was the first son of President Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln.   

biography.com

July 31, 2017 -- Daniel Defoe was an English trader, writer, journalist, pamphleteer, and spy. He is most famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe; only the Bible has been printed in more languages.

poetryfoundation.org

July 28, 2017 -- Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet, Catholic and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets. His manipulation of prosody established him as an innovative writer of verse.

kqed.org

July 27, 2017 -- Norman Milton Lear is an American television writer and producer who produced such 1970s sitcoms as All in the Family, Sanford and Son, One Day at a Time, The Jeffersons, Good Times, and Maude.  

biography.com

July 26, 2017 -- Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer, novelist, philosopher, and prominent member of the Huxley family. He graduated from Balliol College at the University of Oxford with a first-class honours in English literature.  

Public Domain

July 25, 2017 -- Walter Andrew Brennan was an American actor. He won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1936, 1938, and 1940, making him one of only three male actors to win three Academy Awards.  

biography.com

July 24, 2017 -- Alexandre Dumas was born on July 24, 1802, in Villers-Cotterêts, France. He adopted the last name "Dumas" from his grandmother, a former Haitian slave. Dumas established himself as one of the most popular and prolific authors in France, known for plays and historical adventure novels such as The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo. He died on December 5, 1870, in Puys, France. His works have been translated into more than 100 languages and adapted for numerous films.  

marshallmcluhan.com

July 21, 2017 -- Herbert Marshall McLuhan was a Canadian professor, philosopher, and public intellectual. His work is one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries.  

Amazon.com

July 20, 2017 -- Cormac McCarthy is an American novelist, playwright, and screenwriter. He has written ten novels, spanning the southern gothic, western, and post-apocalyptic genres.  

biography.com

July 19, 2017 -- Lizzie Andrew Borden was an American woman who gained infamy after being tried and acquitted for the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The case was a famous case throughout the United States.  

britannica.com

July 18, 2017 -- William Makepeace Thackeray was a British novelist, writer and author of the 19th century. He is known for his satirical works, particularly Vanity Fair, a panoramic portrait of English society.  

biography.com

July 17, 2017 -- Donald McNichol Sutherland is a Canadian actor whose film career spans more than five decades. Sutherland rose to fame after starring in series of successful films including The Dirty Dozen (1967), M*A*S*H (1970), Kelly's Heroes (1970), Klute (1971), Don't Look Now (1973), Fellini's Casanova (1976), 1900 (1976), Animal House (1978), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), Ordinary People (1980) and Eye of the Needle (1981). Since then, he established himself as one of the most respected, prolific and versatile character actors of Canada.  

britannica.com

July 14, 2017 -- Owen Wister was an American writer, historian and "father" of western fiction. He is best remembered for writing The Virginian and a biography of Ulysses S. Grant.  

civilwar.org

July 13, 2017 -- Nathan Bedford Forrest was a lieutenant general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. A cavalry and military commander in the war, Forrest is one of the war's most unusual figures.  

biography.com

July 12, 2017 -- George Washington Carver was born into slavery in Diamond, Missouri, around 1864. The exact year and date of his birth are unknown. Carver went on to become one of the most prominent scientists and inventors of his time, as well as a teacher at the Tuskegee Institute. Carver devised over 100 products using one major crop—the peanut—including dyes, plastics and gasoline. He died in 1943.  

hrokurinn.is

July 11, 2017 -- Thomas Bowdler was an English physician best known for publishing The Family Shakspeare, an expurgated edition of William Shakespeare's work.  

July 10, 2017 -- Godiva, Countess of Mercia, in Old English Godgifu, was an English noblewoman who, according to a legend dating at least to the 13th century, rode naked – covered only in her long hair – through the streets of Coventry to gain a remission of the oppressive taxation that her husband imposed on his tenants.

onlineworldofwrestling.com

June 30, 2017 -- Man Mountain Dean, born Frank Simmons Leavitt, was a professional wrestler of the early 1900s. 

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