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fishing

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife

Now that the Kentucky-based teams are no longer in the NCAA basketball tournament, the Final Four isn’t nearly as exciting, and somewhat depressing, to watch.

The best cure for any bruised feelings left by March Madness is to get out in early April and chase largemouth bass. A huge largemouth bass shaking its head vigorously trying to throw your white spinnerbait soothes any broken basketball heart.

Water temperatures range from 52 degrees at Lake Cumberland in the east to 58 degrees on Kentucky Lake in the west. In other words, it is prime time.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

Spring break for many conjures thoughts of traveling somewhere warm and catnapping on a beach between rounds of golf.

A staycation sounds much better if you’re a muskellunge angler from Kentucky. The state’s muskellunge fishery has earned a reputation that extends beyond its borders, and experienced anglers know spring is one of the can’t-miss times of the year.

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife

The mild weather this winter has many thinking it will be an early spring across Kentucky.

The earlier, the better for anglers, who by late February are like sprinters on their marks waiting for the starter’s pistol to fire.

Some of the best fishing of the year is right around the corner. The new license year is, too. It starts March 1.

For $20, an annual resident Kentucky fishing license serves as a ticket to good fishing opportunities, but also as an investment.

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife

  Kentucky needs more funding to combat the spread of invasive Asian carp in the state’s waterways.

To help fund this need, members of the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission’s Administration, Education and Policy Committee have recommended that the full commission consider increasing Kentucky boat registration fees at its March 17 meeting. The recommendation does not include fees on paddlecraft such as canoes or kayaks.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

  Planning a fishing trip more than a couple days ahead of time can be a gamble in late winter when the weather is a mixed bag and the favorable conditions here today may be gone tomorrow.

With some advance preparation, you can be ready to grab what you need and go when that friend calls at daybreak or the impulse strikes and the schedule allows for a last-minute trip.

Performing regular maintenance on your reels can prevent catastrophic problems or costly repairs down the road.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

Five new lakes enrolled in the Fishing in Neighborhoods Program (FINs) will receive stockings of trout in February, a boon to anglers tired of being house bound.

 

Flemingsburg Old Reservoir, an 11-acre lake in Fleming County, gets 900 trout while Leary Lake, a 5-acre lake on Lloyd Wildlife Management Area in Grant County, gets the same amount of trout. The 9-acre Logan-Hubble Park Lake just south of Lancaster in Garrard County will receive 900 trout as well.

 

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Kentucky Department of Wildlife Resources recently launched a canoeing and kayaking page on its website at fw.ky.gov. Visitors need only to click on the “Boat” tab, then the “Canoeing and Kayaking” tab.

The page provides a repository for valuable information about paddling creeks, rivers and lakes across Kentucky.

Topix

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will draw down Fishtrap Lake in Pike County 22 feet below winter pool by Jan. 23 to conduct maintenance on Fishtrap Lake Dam.

The maintenance activities will concentrate on the withdrawal gate’s hydraulic system and the emergency bulkheads on the intake tower of the dam.

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources

Those who enjoy a natural pine, cedar, spruce or fir tree for Christmas often don’t know what to do with it after the holidays. Many resort to putting it out on the street or chucking it in the backyard until spring.

You can dispose of your natural Christmas tree and provide habitat for fish by donating it to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources instead of the tree languishing in the corner of your back yard or being ground into mulch.

KY Forward

Now that water temperatures are settling downward for the fall, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is resuming its trophy bass propagation program.

The program only accepts trophy-sized largemouth bass from anglers. In return, anglers receive a free replica mount of the fish. Bass accepted for the program are used as broodstock to grow a new generation of large fish.

Chesapeake Bay

Officials have discovered the presence of hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant, in several areas of Cave Run Lake near Morehead. State and federal officials are asking boaters and anglers using Cave Run Lake to take precautions to help prevent the spread of this plant.

Musky Mojo

It is no longer getting dark at dinner time. We are beginning to have days cresting the 50 degree mark. It is enough to make you want to go fishing.

Before you cast a line, however, you need to know about the new fishing regulations that go into effect March 1.

Bass Fishing And Catching

The orange tint in the tops of mature trees portend what is coming our way. Cool nights with crisp, gorgeous days signal not only some of the best days of the year in Kentucky, but also the beginning of the fall reservoir fishing season for largemouth bass.

September is typically the driest month of the year and the water in many lakes becomes air-clear. The clear water combined with the lingering summer thermal stratification of the lake makes predator fish lethargic and skittish. This leads to tough fishing.

Keowee Key

The fisheries division of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is conducting a survey to assess angler attitudes, opinions and fishing habits.

A random sample of 1,800 resident anglers who purchased an annual fishing license in 2014 will receive a survey booklet in the mail. The fisheries division mailed surveys Jan. 12.

“Even if fishing isn’t particularly important to them or they are not experienced anglers, we still want their opinion,” said Dave Dreves, fisheries research biologist for Kentucky Fish and Wildlife.

Examiner

At about the time when the winter boat show season starts to crank up, the annual fishing forecast for Kentucky’s major fisheries arrives as another welcome diversion from the winter doldrums.

Produced by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, it’s a valuable resource for anglers who want to be in the know and plan ahead. The forecast is available online at: http://fw.ky.gov

PBase

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources this week stocked 500 muskies measuring 13 inches apiece in the lake. While the lake is not slated to receive annual stockings of this species, department personnel will add muskellunge when excess fish are available from state hatcheries.

Dewey Lake was once home to the state record tiger muskie, a hybrid cross between muskellunge and the northern pike. The fish that went into the lake this week are pure muskies. The lake is within the native range of muskies in the state.

A habitat improvement project has anglers hoping for their next big catch at Cave Run Lake.

Over the next three years, natural and man-made structures will be sunk at several lake locations. These structures will provide safe cover for small fish and foraging habitat for larger fish. 

Fisheries biologists from state and federal agencies are coordinating with sport fishers and volunteers to implement the project. 

Kentucky's Asian Carp Headed Overseas

Aug 21, 2013
The Lane Report

Wickliffe’s Two Rivers Fishery in Ballard County has shipped its first of many loads of Asian carp to China.

Plant manager Jeff Smith said the plant has a few orders in the United States and overseas, but he’s preparing for the processing plant’s largest order yet.

Customers in China have placed an order for a million pounds of the Asian carp. Smith said that order has a large impact on the new fishery.