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When Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif walked into a roomful of reporters in New York on Saturday, he remarked on how his U.S. visit was going.

"Good," he said. "Not as good as the guy who spent $250 million on the trip."

In 1993, Alex Wagner saw a familiar face on the cover of Time magazine: It was a computer-generated picture of a multiethnic woman who reminded her of ... herself.

Wagner's father is white and from the Midwest; her mother is from what was then Burma. And after reading the Time story on "The New Face of America," Wagner, then a teenager, decided to embrace her identity as a "futureface."

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The United Arab Emirates will contribute $50.4 million to rebuild a mosque and cherished leaning minaret that were destroyed after the Iraqi city of Mosul was overrun by the Islamic State.

Interest rates reached a milestone Tuesday and the stock market frowned.

Tuesday morning, for the first time in four years, the rate on the 10-year U.S. government note topped 3 percent. The bond market move contributed to a sharp sell-off in stocks, as investors wondered whether the long-running bull market might be at a pivot point.

The Dow Jones industrial average swung more than 750 points in the trading day. The key stock index closed down 425 points, or about 1.7 percent. The S&P 500 index lost 1.3 percent for the day.

After months of searching, the fourth annual Tiny Desk Contest winner has been announced!

Members of the nomadic Bajau people often spend up to five hours a day underwater. They're hunting for fish, octopus and other seafood.

And they don't even use diving gear.

So what's their secret?

New research suggests this extraordinary diving ability is due to a special trait the Bajau have developed: larger spleens.

It's feeding time at Brad Felger's farm in Washington's Skagit Valley. And he's about to feed 40 hungry falcons.

Yes, falcons.

They're an important, albeit often unseen, part of farming in some states, used as a defense mechanism to keep away pesky birds like starlings, which love to eat berries and apples.

Since age 12, Felger has had a self-described love for everything with feathers, scales or tails.

"Falconers are, what's the word I'm looking for ... eccentric," Felger says.

How many attacks are there on health care facilities in Syria?

Dr. Rohini Haar, a public health researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, led a team that collected ground reports of attacks in 2016 in northern Syria, filed by civilians via cellphone text.

The man suspected of killing at least 10 people on Monday by plowing a rented white van down crowded Toronto sidewalks appeared in court Tuesday morning and has been charged with 10 counts of murder and 13 counts of attempted murder.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that foreign corporations cannot be sued for damages in U.S. courts for aiding in terrorist attacks or other human rights violations. The vote was 5-to-4.

Writing for the conservative majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said the"courts are not well suited to make the required policy judgments implicated by corporate liability in cases like this one."

Rather, the political branches — Congress and the executive — should deal with these issues, he said.

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

Organizers of a newsroom union at the Chicago Tribune have informed its publisher that colleagues have given such overwhelming formal support for their effort that the paper's parent company should recognize the guild voluntarily and start to negotiate a contract.

The organizers gave the Tribune's parent company, Tronc, a day to make a decision.

Updated at 2:04 p.m. ET

President Trump is celebrating America's oldest alliance, with French President Emmanuel Macron. But even as they prepare for a lavish state dinner, the two leaders could not paper over stark differences on issues such as trade and the Iran nuclear deal.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Democratic lawmakers are calling for a subpoena to force the U.S. Census Bureau and Commerce Department to release internal documents about the decision to add a controversial citizenship question to forms for the upcoming national headcount.

The request comes two weeks before a congressional oversight hearing on the 2020 census.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's pick to lead the Veterans Affairs Department, has been accused of creating a hostile work environment, drinking while on duty and improperly prescribing drugs to staff during his time as White House doctor to two administrations, according to Montana Sen. Jon Tester.

From the company that brought you the option of letting a courier inside your home comes a new service: package delivery inside your car.

President Trump's tariffs on imported steel aren't the first time the industry has gotten protection from the U.S. government. Not by a long shot. In fact, tariff protection for the industry — which politicians often say is a vital national interest — goes back to the very beginning of the republic.

In his book, Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Dartmouth professor Douglas Irwin writes that protection for the metal producers began in the 1790s.

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Announcing The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest Winner

12 hours ago

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